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Speech Therapy is often referred to as Speech. Pediatric Speech Therapy uses creative and meaningful activities to help a child fully communicate and understand language.

Speech-language pathologists (speech therapists) help children achieve milestones such as gesturing, speaking, understanding language, reading, understanding facial expressions, playing with toys, and interacting with peers.

A Speech-language pathologist may evaluate and treat the following:

  • Receptive Language Skills (understanding the meaning of spoken language)
  • Expressive Language Skills (verbal & non-verbal communication)
  • Pragmatic Language (social skills)
  • Articulation, Fluency, and Voice (quality and clarity of spoken language)
  • Augmentative and Alternative Communication (AAC)
  • Feeding skills and Oral Motor Skills
  • Executive functioning

Speech Therapy Credentials

A speech-language pathologist must be a graduate of an accredited educational program with a Master’s degree. They must complete a clinical rotation to earn their certificate of clinical competence (CCC) and be licensed by their state board. A speech therapy assistant must be a graduate of an accredited educational program with a Bachelor’s degree and licensed by their state board. A speech assistant may provide treatment with monthly supervision from a speech-language pathologist. Speech therapy assistants may not conduct evaluations or establish treatment plans independently.